I hope you dance

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Whatever today holds for you – a cup of tea or a night out with friends – I hope you see it with beauty. I hope you cherish each moment. I hope, wherever life finds you, you choose to dance.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

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Tolerance (n., v., a way of life)

I never saw Tolerance as a word on my spelling tests in elementary school. I don’t recall it even being a topic of discussion until I was a teen. And that is a shame, because it’s a word we often forget.

Every time someone has a different opinion. Every time someone lives by a different belief. Every time our world view comes into conflict with another’s.

The human instinct is to abandon tolerance. No longer are we in conflict with someone else’s idea. No, it’s that person, that other with whom we are in battle. And when the battle is between two people, we lose focus on the topic. We start to throw knives at the individual. We start to become, quite simply, intolerant.

And, especially now, in 2017, with all that we see in the news each day, we as a civilization must remember that intolerance is not okay. It is something to never support in words or behaviors.

Yet, we still see intolerance, in many forms – intolerance for gender equality, intolerance for racial and religious groups, even intolerance for one’s scientific stance. Every time a medical professional makes mention of fluoride, for instance, intolerance sweeps the internet. Anti-fluoridation groups find their way to the most minimally accessed webpages, and they drop articles claiming dangers of a tool the medical profession has lauded – with scientific basis – as one of the greatest and most accessible public health reforms in modern history. Based on evidence, the benefits are undeniable.

And yet, there are opponents.  As there are opponents to vaccinations. As there are opponents to the reigning political party at any given time in history.

Wherever there is a belief or a theory or a fact, there will be alternative options. And that’s okay. We each have a right and a duty to share our positions. We each have a responsibility to support our beliefs.

AND we each have a duty to respect that another may still choose an alternate belief. That’s what makes life so colorful! In a show of that respect, our debates must start and end with evidence. The minute the attack becomes personal, the minute our arguments become a means of belittling another person, the topic of debate grows irrelevant.

The new topic of focus becomes, quite simply, tolerance.

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In response to the attacks I have received over my life – for my gender, for my religion, even for my beliefs on the dental benefits of fluoride – I often choose to not answer. I often choose to not engage. There is no useful response to an argument that starts with a personal assault and ends with malicious name, except to preach tolerance. Except to remind everyone of a time when some part of who they were or what they believed was under attack. For no reason but religion or gender or the color of your skin, you were deemed to be less than. You were treated as an object. And that wasn’t okay. That is never okay.

In Jewish tradition, holidays commemorating the victory of battle are always bittersweet. We praise the grace of Hashem to guide the Jewish people to freedom, but still, we mourn all that was lost. Even if the loss was to the other group, we take a moment of silence. They, too, are people. They, too, have value in this world. And though our ideas and objectives can come into conflict, our shared humanity is something that will never change.

Start each day with tolerance, and you will see that the world is a radiant place.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

 

3 Poems Published on Scarlet Leaf Review

So honored that 3 of my poems were just published on Scarlet Leaf Review.

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– Terrified, screaming woman murdered by boyfriend before his suicide in Lakewood.

– We Just Stop Singing

and

– When I open a book

All three are based on articles in the news. All three are available online by CLICKING HERE.

Thank you for reading and thank you Scarlet Leaf Review for sharing this work.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

 

 

Dental Health Tips for Kids: Help Your Child’s Smile Bloom

We all want the same for our children:

Health. Happiness. A lifetime of smiles.

And with a few simple oral health changes at home, we CAN give our kids a bit of each! Today, let’s start with just four of these easy-to-do changes for healthier smiles and healthier kids.

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Click HERE to read the four tips on The Huffington Post,

And bring your kids to Harvard Dental Center on February 3, 2018, for free dental care, crafts, education and more! Call 617-432-1434 Option #1 to schedule your child’s FREE dental visit.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

Just LOLA [Laugh Out Loud Already!]

Improv comedy has nothing to do with being funny.  No joke!  In fact, if you try to be funny, chances are you’ll fail.  Really, improv is about welcoming the moment.  In this instant, in this context, how can we find humor?  In this scene, in this story, where can we spread joy?  If we are really listening, there is always joy.

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Improv is about noticing what is around us and choosing to see it in a way that lifts our spirits (and the spirits of our audience members).  And in no way is this philosophy limited to the stage!

Notice the world around you.  Take it in.  And now, as if out of nowhere, start laughing.  Hysterically!  Start chuckling and belly-jiggling.  Start smiling as though your favorite comedian took center-stage.  I’ll join in!

And observe.  Was there actual humor in the moment?  A joke that came to mind or a story you recalled?  Perhaps you were laughing at me telling you to laugh at nothing.  Maybe you found humor in the fact that you actually listened to this crazy advice, or you rejoiced in the juxtaposition of your laughter with absolute silence.

Whatever the reason, keep laughing.  Keep smiling.  And you will never see that room or that moment without joy again.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

The Ethics of Dentistry

One of the standards of dental ethics is patient self-determination. By providing patients with the opportunity for voluntary, informed consent or refusal, dentists can empower patients to take charge of their treatment choices.

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After being in the dental clinic as a pre-doctoral student, my eyes opened to the possibility:

  • What if this informed consent process were made easier – for patients and providers?
  • What if the information weren’t so … dare I say, boring, and possibly even confusing?
  • What if quality of process and experience were both taken into consideration in a re-haul of this tedious routine?

So I took to the Huffington Post with a dental practice management article of a research-base. If informed consent is something that interests you, be sure to FOLLOW THIS LINK and take a look.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.