In Support of Healthy Smiles

Harvard School of Dental Medicine Gives Kids A Smile

Every day, a child in the United States goes to school, camp, or simply the playground with a chronic infection. The child may not be sneezing or sniffling, but his/her teeth certainly are. Today, however, was a day for change. At Give Kids A Smile 2018, the students and staff at Harvard School of Dental Medicine decided to take a stand in support of healthy smiles and against those cavity bugs the dental world calls caries.

To read more about Give Kids A Smile and this Boston event, CLICK HERE, and be sure to visit your dentist to talk about mouth-healthy habits for your house.

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© 2018 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

 

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Free Smiles

Are you or your friends/family in the Boston area? Invite them to Harvard School of Dental Medicine THIS SATURDAY for absolutely free dental care for the kids.

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We’ll have free dental care, crafts, education, games, prizes and more on this dental treasure hunt for the kids! Walk-ins welcome. Smiles guaranteed.

If you are not in the Boston area, there still may be a GKAS near you! Check out the American Dental Association Foundation Map to help locate the nearest dental resources for children and families in your area.

© 2018 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

You CAN Change a Life

“Children don’t have to live with dental disease.”

The American Dental Association opened their Give Kids A Smile article with this very tagline, quoting an interview with me after the October 2017 Give Kids A Smile® Leadership Institute in St. Louis, Missouri. As one of ten Give Kids A Smile Leadership Ambassadors in the 2017 cohort, I was honored to learn from the founders of Give Kids A Smile and experience the heart of dentistry alongside incredible and inspiring colleagues. In only a few days, we gathered tips for building our own programs, ideas for integrating medicine and dentistry, and a network with whom we can collaborate to reach more and more children across the nation. Most importantly, we played an active role in providing dental care for hundreds of children in need.

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We all have a role in ensuring the children around us have access to healthy smiles. That role can be everything from bringing good dental care to your own home with tips from the American Dental Association’s Mouth Healthy website to volunteering at your local GKAS events. Perhaps you choose to donate dental supplies or funds to the cause, or help connect children you know to GKAS programs in your area. Maybe you prefer to read a book about dental care at your local library or preschool. As a program of the ADA Foundation, the 501c3 charitable arm of the American Dental Association, Give Kids A Smile provides opportunity for you to learn more about and get involved in Give Kids A Smile at the ADA Foundation webpage.
The opportunities to spread smiles surround us every day. With Give Kids A Smile, the impact is beyond compare.

Contact Me if you have any questions about how you can get involved in Give Kids A Smile or in spreading smiles in your community in any capacity. Collaboration is the key to success, and you are the essential ingredient!

The original blog post can be found at The Huffington Post. 

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

Dental Health Tips for Kids: Help Your Child’s Smile Bloom

We all want the same for our children:

Health. Happiness. A lifetime of smiles.

And with a few simple oral health changes at home, we CAN give our kids a bit of each! Today, let’s start with just four of these easy-to-do changes for healthier smiles and healthier kids.

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Click HERE to read the four tips on The Huffington Post,

And bring your kids to Harvard Dental Center on February 3, 2018, for free dental care, crafts, education and more! Call 617-432-1434 Option #1 to schedule your child’s FREE dental visit.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

This One Story Will Transform Your Day, if not your life

Hey there!

Whatever you are doing right now, stop. Pull up a chair; put on those reading glasses. Maybe grab a cup of tea. Let’s just have a chat, friend-to-friend.

I know; I know. We barely know one another. I’m a dental student typing from Boston, Massachusetts, you’re a blogger off on the other side of the country, if not the world. But trust me. This moment matters.

Because I want to tell you a story from not too long ago; in fact, this was just a few days over a week ago. Iarrived in clinic ready to meet a new patient; we’ll call her Lailah. She was 5’7 and calm, and really just wanting relief from her pain. When she sat down beside me, so much was going wrong – in her medical condition, in her dental health – but she was just so optimistic.

 

“I’m getting ready for Thanksgiving,” she told me, describing her large family. “I don’t want to be in pain on the holiday.”

 

“I don’t want you in pain, either,” I answered, reading her radiographs. “Let’s see what we can do together before then.”

 

Lailah let me know about a few of her medical conditions, the cancer for which she was receiving treatment, the congenital heart disease that didn’t seem to worry her cardiologist any longer, the hypothyroidism that seemed to be under control. Through her full story, she was radiating with the warmth of a smile.

 

“I promise,” I told Lailah, “to do what I can to move your treatment forward in time for the holidays. We can’t do everything by then, but we’ll work together here.”

 

The minute Lailah left my office, the work began.

 

I called every doctor she named, spoke to every dental advisor I could reach. I carefully, and with haste, developed her treatment plan, and prepared for the next stages of her care. And when I spoke with her oncologist, my heart sank.

 

“Lailah has 6 months to live,” her oncologist boldly introduced. “One year at most. Unless we find the cure for her type of cancer in the next year, I want you to understand, we are not doing normal dentistry here. Extract the infected teeth. We start chemo on the first.”

Now take a deep breath for me, perhaps a moment pause. I’m not telling you this story to catch your breath. And my intention is certainly not educational, though I can’t help but notice just how impactfully this story demonstrates the intersection of medicine and dentistry.

But I am sharing this story with a goal.

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When Lailah and I met, I knew her care was important. I knew her healthy smile mattered. It’s the same approach I have with each and every patient in my chair. Even if my job is to simply guide the patient to a specialist or someone who can offer the needed attention, I give my time, heart, and growing knowledge and experience to that patient. Every patient matters.

Knowing Lailah was going to die didn’t make her matter any more or any less. She was still a patient. She was always important.

And, in so many ways, she reminded me of what really matters:

  • The opportunity to share the warmth of your smile with everyone around you, even the dental student you just met.
  • The gift of spending the holidays out of pain and in the embrace of family.
  • The hope that our actions today will make for a better world tomorrow.
  • The faith that everything will be okay.
  • The courage to move forward no matter what weight follows us from our pasts.
  • And the joy of knowing we have made an impact in this world, whether within our own families and communities or on a larger scale. We have mattered.

In Kabbalah, in Jewish tradition, Lailahel is an angel, one who comes to the world with a message to share. My patent, Lailah, is just that, sharing with us, each day, her beautiful messages of hope, faith, and gratitude. This holiday season, let us all try to have a touch of an angel – a touch of gratitude and optimism – in our hearts and minds. No matter what has happened today or this year, all that matters is now, and how, even with a simple smile, we can choose to make a true difference,

All names, characters, business, places, events, and incidents have been changed for privacy. As a compilation of many patient experiences, any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.  

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

Because You Deserve a Healthy Smile

Chances are, every single one of us reading this post either has or knows someone who has dental anxiety. The fear is real!

More importantly, the fear is manageable.

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Working with your dentist and these five simple tips, you can start to bring that anxiety under control, because nothing should come between you and the healthy, beautiful smile you deserve.

CLICK HERE to read my latest dental article on The Huffington Post, and be sure to share it with that dentist or anxious family member/friend in your life!

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

 

You Are a Part of the Solution: Remedying the Opioid Crisis

Every day, over 90 Americans die from an opioid overdose. And, we are each a part of the solution.

Click Here to read Mirissa D. Price’s Huffington Post article on the topic of Opioid Abuse and the Dental Profession.

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NPR’s Robert Siegel of All Things Considered came to discuss this very issue at Harvard School of Dental Medicine in August of 2017. They happened to catch me learning how to make provisional restorations in the process (the above photo). Click here to listen to the full broadcast from the Harvard and Boston dental community.

Whether you are the patient, the family member, the medical doctor, social worker, or dentist, it’s time to ask yourself one simple question:

What role will you take in creating the solution? 

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.

Harness Your Power To Heal

A woman sat beside me at the doctor’s office. “I’m in pain,” she said, cradling her knee. Under the flow of her skirt, I couldn’t see what was wrong. Was it swollen? Was it bruised? Was she bleeding and bandaged? All I knew were her words: ‘I’m in pain.’

 

As we humans tend to do, my first instinct was sympathy. Phrases like, ‘I’m so sorry to hear that,’ and ‘Can I do anything for you?’ came to mind. Thoughts of fetching an ice pack and consoling a stranger claimed my brain.

 

But I didn’t even know if she needed ice!

And as a medical provider trained in empathy, I could hear how distancing these words really were. ‘I’m sorry to hear that,’ is nice, but it doesn’t mean I share in your pain. ‘Can I do anything for you’ is generous, but it still makes this pain your problem, not mine. In a world of personal boundaries, sympathy is the safest of routes, but it’s far from the most healing.

 

But the empathetic route, the option to turn to her and say, ‘That must be hard’ or ‘I can’t even imagine what you are experiencing,’ just didn’t seem right either. Because her knee hurt – I could imagine that much. And, as I have learned in my years of improv comedy, never assume another person is thinking the same as you. Maybe this pain is something that excites her – though, that would feel odd. Or, maybe her experience is anger, not sorrow. Maybe she’s angry because her kid left a toy in the hallway and that led to her trip and fall. I hear an improvised ‘Yes, and…’ in the distance. Maybe her kid is a teenager and the game was a video game console that he was supposed to put away hours ago! The real pain is having to deal with that son of hers when she gets home.

 

Who am I to assume another’s story?

And who am I to intrude on her experience? Sure, I could ask how she feels. I could ask her to tell me more, but I wasn’t her doctor. I wasn’t even an acquaintance. I was a neighbor, a fellow patient in waiting. I was a woman sitting in the same position as her with the only difference being our chief complaints.

 

And even as a complete stranger, I carried the power to help.

 

“Have you heard of biofeedback?” I asked, speaking as though I was simply starting a casual conversation. With a neurological illness as a child, biofeedback was one of the many tools at my disposal. With patients in the dental chair, biofeedback was one of the most powerful techniques for alleviating the anxious mind. And in the absence of technology, I knew meditation could be just as complete. “Your mind is a powerful thing.”

 

I closed my eyes and rested my hands. I softened my shoulders, and let my head fall. I felt the chair beneath my body, and the floor beneath my feet. I asked her to do the same. I took a deep breath in, tasting the air of my surroundings, smelling the plastic of the waiting room chairs. I took a deep breath out, purifying my body of that doctor office smell. I pictured what kind of room the smell came from. I let that image go. I pictured the paintings on the walls. I let those paintings go.

 

“My hands feel heavy,” I whispered, letting their weight fall into my lap. She repeated. She felt the same.

 

“My arms feel heavy,” I whispered, letting my shoulders sag against their weight. She repeated. She did the same.

 

“My arms feel warm,” I smiled, embracing the air around me. My eyes were closed, but I like to imagine she felt the same.

 

“I feel calm and relaxed,” I inhaled, dropping expression from my face. “I feel calm and relaxed,” I exhaled, dropping pain from my mind. “I feel calm and relaxed,” I finished, nearly falling asleep.

 

“Rosa, Rosa Sorencio!” A nurse called a name in the distance, opening our eyes to attention. “Rosa!”

 

And just as quickly as we met, we parted ways, but we weren’t strangers any more. We weren’t women in passing. We were neighbors, or slightly more, united by a moment of calm, gathered in the strength of our own beautiful minds.

 

And if you think this is just a story, think again! Because your mind is just as powerful. Your strength is just as beautiful.

 

Each and every one of us carries such an incredible power of healing. Our only true barrier to calm is our noisy selves.

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I close my eyes. I relax.

I am at peace.

© 2017 Mirissa D. Price: A Dental Student, A Writer, A Journey to Share.